BUBBLES THEME

Page 3




Bubble Recipes

The Unbelievable Bubble Book by John Cassidy

This has lots of interesting info about bubbles.
1 cup Joy or Dawn
3-4 tablespoons glycerin
10 cups cold water (more on dry days)
It works best if you let it set a day or so. I work with a large group so I usually pour it into large basins or dishpans and spread them out so that everyone has plenty of room. Be sure you are on a surface such as grass that won't get too slippery. High humidity is good for bubble making.

Blowing Bubbles

Children love blowing bubbles, and summertime is a great time for this outdoor science activity. The following bubble solution makes it easy to blow really big bubbles. (The magic ingredient is glycerin, available at drugstores.)

BIG BUBBLE SOLUTION

3/4 Cups Joy brand liquid dishwashing detergent
1/4 cup glycerin
1/2 gallon water

Mix all ingredients and pour into a shallow pan. Excess solution can be stored in a sealed container. This solution works best if it is allowed to set for several days before use.
~Submitted by Karen in KS

BUBBLES, BUBBLES, BUBBLES!!!

Bubble Solution #1

1 cup of water
2 tbsp liquid detergent
1 tbsp glycerine
1/2 tsp sugar

Bubble Solution #2

2/3 cup liquid dish detergent
1 gallon water
1 tbsp glycerin (optional)

Bubble Solution #3 (my favorite)

3 cups water
2 cups Joy liquid detergent
1/2 cup Karo syrup

Combine ingredients and allow to sit in an open container for at least a
day before using. The longer the solution sits the better the bubbles.

Best Bubble Solution

Materials:
1 c Water
2 Tbs. Light Karo syrup OR 2 Tbs. Glycerin
4 tb Dishwashing liquid
Mix together and have fun!

Bubble Mix #2

Materials:
1/2 C. Water
1/2 C. Liquid Detergent
1 Tbl. Cooking Oil
Mix together and use

Bubble Solution

3 C. water
2 C. Joy liquid detergent
� C. Karo syrup

Combine ingredients and allow to sit in an open container for at least a day before using. The longer the solution sits the better the bubbles.

Recipe for Homemade bubble mix

1 gallon water
� cup Joy � dish washing liquid
� cup glycerin

The longer the solution sits, the stronger the bubbles will be :-)

Bubble Solution

Simple Solution - makes 4 ounces
2 Tbsp. dishwashing liquid
1/2 cup water

Super-Sized Solution - makes 1 gallon
1 3/4 cups dishwashing liquid
12 cups water

Bubble Solution

1/8 cup dishwashing liquid
1 cup water

Bubble Solutions

Encourage the children to assist in preparing the following bubble solutions. (NOTE: The use of glycerine in preparing the bubble solution is optional. It helps to provide a stronger skin on the bubble, but the solutions can be prepared without this ingredient.)

RECIPE #1

1/4 cup liquid dish soap, 1/2 cup water, 1 teaspoon sugar

RECIPE #2 - 3 cups water, 2 cups liquid dish soap (Joy detergent), 1/2 cup light corn syrup

RECIPE #3 - 2/3 cup liquid dish soap, 1 gallon of water, 1 tablespoon glycerine



Theme Ideas

The Bubble Game

Join hands with your children in a circle. Have everyone walk forward while holding hands, forming as small a circle as possible. Then sing the following song and move as directed.

Sung to: "Ring Around the Rosie"
Blow air in our bubble.
(Move one step backward while holding hands.)
Blow air in our bubble.
(Move one step backward while holding hands.)
Bigger, bigger,
(Move one step backward while holding hands.)
We stop and pop!
(Drop hands and fall to the ground.)

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Bubble Windows

You'll need 2 straws and 1 yard of cotton string per child. Thread the straws onto the string and knot the string. Slide the knot inside one of the straws. When you hold one straw in each hand and spread out the string it should look like a rectangle. The children dip the bubble windows into the bubble solution while holding the straws side by side. As they take the windows out of the solution, they should slowly pull the straws apart. This will make a window of bubbles. Some questions I asked were: What happens when you pull your window through the air? Can you poke things through without popping it? Can a friend put his/her finger through the window without popping it? Can a friend put another window through yours?

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Blowing Bubbles

What You Are Going to Teach:Air is a real substance and has weight. Light sometimes changes color when it passes through water. Science can be fun.

Needed: Liquid detergent, straws, cups, construction paper, crayons.

Put a small amount of soap and water into cups so that each child has a cup of soapy water. Dip the end of the straw into the cup, remove straw allowing the soapy mixture to drip once. Blow gently and produce a bubble. Talk about air being inside of the bubble. Talk about how the bubble has different colors because light changes when it shines through the bubble. Ask the children why they think bubbles burst when they hit the ground.

What to Talk About: Bubbles, pop, liquid, blow, colors, circle.

An Explanation of Principles: Light is broken into different wave lengths as it passes through water, allowing the different colors to be seen. Wet rings on the construction paper show that a bubble is composed of water surrounding air.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Mounds of Bubbles

Do in a water table or large bathtub. Add bubble bath, fill with water on high pressure to form lots of bubbles. Pour out some of the water after the bubbles have formed - the table should contain mostly bubbles with just a small amount of water. Let the kids explore the bubbles. Talk with them about the mounds of bubbles and the tiny bubbles. Let them clap with bubbles in their hands to see what happens. Add a few sponges to the bubbles, encourage them to squeeze the sponges to make more bubbles. Replace the bubbles and water as needed.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Wet/Dry

While blowing bubbles with the children try touching a bubble with a dry finger. Repeat using a wet finger. What happens? You will observe that bubbles break when they touch an object that is dry.

Bubble Jar

Fill a small plastic bottle half full of water. Add a few drops of food coloring, if desired. Add baby oil or mineral oil to completely fill the jar. Secure the bottle tightly. Then slowly tilt the bottle from side to side. When this occurs, the liquid in the jar resembles waves. Bubbles can be created by shaking the bottle. Encourage the children to observe these reactions.

Here is another idea for bubbles. You will need Styrofoam cups, rubber bands, straws that do not bend, and a piece of cotton cloth. Fill the cup � of the way with solution. Poke a hole near the top with the straw and insert. Cover the top with a square of cloth (I use an old piece of flannel or cut up towel) secured with the rubber band. Then have the children blow into the straw and watch the bubbles come out the top. If it works right, the bubbles will be in one long continuos piece...really cool.

Bubble Fun

Dawn dish soap
Baby pool
Box or crate
Water
Hula hoop

Bubbles are a lot of fun, but glycerin in the eyes STINGS! The best recipe of all is just DAWN dishwashing liquid and water! They make the absolute best bubbles! For lots of bubble fun...get a baby pool and fill it with bubble solution. Place a box or a crate in the middle that kids can stand on...get a hula hoop and place it over the box/crate and into the bubble mixture, then have a child stand on the box/crate. An adult can pull up the hula hoop and it makes a bubble as big as the kids and they are actually INSIDE the bubble! Kids love it! Take pictures!

Floating Bubbles

Let the children pretend to be bubbles. Play soft music and have them "float" like bubbles around the room.

Dancing Bubbles

Have children break up into groups of 3. Holding hands forming thier own circle. Have several groups of children slowly and gently spin. Tell them to "float" like bubbles. Works best in a large area designed for large motor activities. As the children float and drift, they will eventually "dance" into each other, causing the bubble to get bigger, until all the little bubbles, join with each other, and form one large bubble, continuing to dance until the large bubble eventually bursts or "pops". The children like to do this dance to soft music, and will ask for this activity over and over.

Bubble Bag

Fill a large resealable freezer bag with styling gel. Tape the top portion with clear mailing tape. Put the bags out on the table for kids to explore. Talk with them about the bubbles in the gel, the smooth texture, the squishy gel, their squeezing actions. Make a variety of bags by adding some of the following:

Food coloring - let the kids mix the colors into the gel by squeezing the bag
Glitter, sequins or confetti - the children can watch them move around as they squeeze the bag.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Bubble Experimentation

Bubble blowing naturally gives rise to scientific investigation. Your children will notice that not all bubbles behave the same way. Let your children experiment with bubbles for several days. They may discover answers to some of the following questions. What happens if they blow hard? If they blow softly? What color are bubbles? Are all bubbles the same shape? The same size? If they touch a bubble, what happens? How long do bubbles last?

This would be good for the older school kids who will be out of school!!

~Submitted by Karen in KS

Human Bubble

Fill a small wading pool with bubble solution. (combine 1 part liquid dish soap w/12 parts water and a few drops of glycerin or Karo syrup.) Use different bubble-blowing tools: plastic rings from soda six-packs, for instance, or wands made from pipe cleaners. And what do you have if a child stands inside a hula hoop in the pool and you pull the hoop up around him? A human bubble!

Water/Bubble Play

Put a generous amount of liquid dish detergent into a plastic dish pan of water. Let the children play freely in bubbly water with cups, spoons and rotary beater to make more bubbles.

Bubble Wrap

It's also fun to put big sheets of bubble wrap on the floor and they can jump on them to pop the bubbles.

Make whipped cream

When you first start mixing you can see the bubbles. As you continue to whip, the bubbles get smaller & smaller. When they understand that whipped cream is just really small bubbles you can introduce shaving cream as the same concept. Put shaving cream on the table and let them smoosh it all over the table. You can add a little paint and then they can lift a print that way too.

Here is another idea for bubbles. You will need styrofoam cups, rubber bands, straws that do not bend, and a piece of cotton cloth. Fill the cup part of the way with solution. Poke a hole near the top with the straw and insert. Cover the top with a square of cloth (I use an old piece of flannel or cut up towel) secured with the rubber band. Then have the children blow into the straw and watch the bubbles come out the top. If it works right, the bubbles will be in one long continous piece...really cool.



Links

The Bubblesphere
Bubble-Mania
Preschool Bubble Theme - Everything Preschool
Bubbles - Exploratorium



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