Arctic Theme

Page 4



Games

Polar Animal Hide and Seek

Have all the children hide their eyes while you "hide" a polar animal in the room. (It should be placed in plain view) Tell the children to find the polar animal, but not touch it. Once they spot it they should sit back down in their spot. The first one to sit down again will get to hide the polar animal.

*Variation: Play the game the same as above, except hide the polar animal. Then tell the children individually whether they are "hot" or "cold" to the relation of the polar animal. Allow the other children to have a chance to hide the polar animal, and tell children whether they are "hot or cold". It may be a good idea to discuss the meaning of hot and cold before you play this game.

~Submitted by Tammy in NC

Polar Animal Shape Fishing Game

Tie 3 feet of string to a wooden spoon. Attach a magnet to the end of the string. Cut and laminate many different colored polar animal shapes from construction paper (not too big though). Attach a paper clip to each polar animal shape. Spread the polar animal shapes on the floor and let your child try to catch the polar animal shape. Have them try to catch the star or the biggest tree. For a twist, label the polar animal shapes with letters or numbers.

~Submitted by Tammy in NC



Theme Ideas

Ice Cave

Turn the block center into an ice cave for the children. Hang long pieces of white butcher block paper around the edges of the center. Put blue butcher block paper on the walls. Then add blue and white streamers hanging from the ceiling. Put blue nap mats on the floor. Painted some of the blocks white or wrap them in white paper (the kids love to build igloos) Add cottonballs and added stuffed polar bears, seals, fish, etc.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Ice Sculpture

Place block of ice in dishpan. put a small bowl of rock salt and spoon close by. let the shildren take turns spooning salt over the ice. wherever the rock salt touches the ice will melt faster leaving a pattern of holes. in addition, set out three eyedroppers and three small contatiners filled with diluted red, yellow, and blue food coloring. let the children drop the colors on the ice. as the ice melts, the colors will run together and produce secondary colors.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Sensory Table

When rinsing out paint cups the colored water can be saved in large containers (buckets, dish pans, etc.) and set outside to freeze. You can make slush out of snow and water and use it to "glue" the big colorful chunks of ice that you've taken out of the containers. The children make the most beautiful structures and castles etc. If you don't get a lot of winter weather where you live you can modify this activity for the sensory table. Freeze colored water in several different types of small containers and put them in the water table. Use table salt to stick them together. We also spray paint the snow with liquid water color & water in spray bottles.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Blubber Experiment

Take two small plastic bags-turn one of them inside out and place it inside the other bag. Spoon crisco shortening in between the two bags and seal them together. This makes a blubber mitten and the kids can insert their hands into the mitten and put their hand into icy water and see the difference that the blubber makes in keeping warm.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Blubber Experiment #2

This is really cool but messy at first. Take two rubber gloves. Add a stick or cup of shortening or butter to one (yep- shove it on in there!) Give each child a glove to put on. Fill a pot with water and lots of ice. Talk about how there isn't much fat on hands and how it feels cold easily. Let each child stick their gloved hand in the ice water and describe it. Then shove their gloved hand into the shortening filled glove, mold the fat filled glove around their's so that their hand is completely surrounded by the fat. Tell them this is like the fat that penguins have under their skin. Emerse it into the water and no cold is felt! Talk about how the penguins stay warm this way. Polar bears as well. When the child goes to take their gloved hand out, wrap your hand around theirs and scrape the fat off keeping it inside the glove for the next child. Sounds harder to do than it really is. And lots if fun!!!!

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Hoola-Hoop Igloo

Tell the children that the hola-hoops are igloos. Have the children run around the igloo, crawl through the igloo, jump up and down in the igloo. Use your imagination to come up with a variety of movement directions.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Alaskan Animals

There are many wonderful animals in Alaska. The children may be unfamiliar with some of these animals. Locate pictures of the animals listed below to show your children. If possible, find two pictures of each animal so the children can match the ones that are the same. You could also show the children three pictures at the same time. Have two of the pictures be of the same animal and one picture of a different animal. Ask the children to find the animal that is different.

Animals

Walrus, Seal, Polar Bear, Kodiak Bear, Fish, Moose, Raccoon, Elk, Caribou, Deer, Reindeer, Whale, Beaver, Bald Eagle

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

New Words

Young children always enjoy learning new words, especially if it is a word for something that they already understand. Here are four words that are used in Alaska that children can learn.

PARKA: Hooded coat
MUKLUK: Fur Boots
KAYAK: One person boat (little boat)
UMIAK: 30-foot whaleboat (big boat)

The word Alaska means "Great Land"

Make pictures of the new words and have the children learn the new words.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Ice Fishing

Many people earn a living in Alaska by fishing. Some of the different types of fish they catch are: Salmon, Halibut, King Crab and Shrimip. Ask the children if they have ever eaten any of those fish. Someone in Alaska might have caught a fish that they ate. Prepare paper cut-outs of fish. Make the fish all different sizes and colors. Place a paper clip on each fish. Put the fish in a box with a hole in the top. The children are going to go ice fishing. Place a magnet on a string to fish with. Have the children describe the fish that they catch.

~Submitted by Cheryl's Sweethearts ChildCare

Vote and Graph it

Have the children vote for their favorite polar animal and graph the results. Which animals did most children like the best? Would a bear be a good pet?

Have the children vote if a polar bear would be a good pet. Record the results on a graph. What is the result? Discuss with the children that a bear would not be a good pet and reasons why. I.e... claws, eat a lot of food, they don't like humans, they might hurt us.

~Submitted by Tammy in NC

Polar Animal Shape Match Up

There are many ways to set this up depending on the skill level or the particular skill you wish to work on. Try these different set ups: (Use your own Polar Animal Shapes... Penguin, Seal, Bear etc.)

---Cut out Polar Animal Shapes from different colors of paper. Give each child one Polar Animal Shape. Ask the children to find one person with the same color Polar Animal Shape.

---Cut out Polar Animal Shapes from different colors of paper. Cut the Polar Animal Shapes in half using a puzzle type cut, like zig zag or interlocking pieces. Give each child one half of a Polar Animal Shape, and ask them to find the person with the other half.

Or Give the children two pieces and have the children make a circle, with one child that has one match on one side and the other match on the other side. You may end up with 2 or more circles depending on how the Polar Animal Shape pieces are distributed.

---Cut out Polar Animal Shapes from one color of paper. Cut the Polar Animal Shapes in half using a puzzle type cut, like zig zag or interlocking pieces. Give each child one half of a Polar Animal Shape, and ask them to find the person with the other half.

Or Give the children two pieces and have the children make a circle, with one child that has one match on one side and the other match on the other side. You may end up with 2 or more circles depending on how the Polar Animal Shape pieces are distributed.

---Cut the Polar Animal Shapes from one color of paper. Label one set of Polar Animal Shapes with numbers, i.e. if you have 20 children, label the Polar Animal Shapes with the numbers one to ten. The other half, draw one dot on one, two on another, and so on until ten. Give each child one Polar Animal Shape and have them find the child with their match.

---Cut the Polar Animal Shapes from one color of paper. Place matching stickers on two Polar Animal Shapes. Give each child one Polar Animal Shape and have them find the child with their match.

---Cut the Polar Animal Shapes from one color of paper. Cut the Polar Animal Shapes in half using a puzzle type cut, like zig zag or interlocking pieces. Place matching stickers on each half of a Polar Animal Shape. Give each child one Polar Animal Shape half and have them find the child with their match.

---Place matching Polar Animal stickers on separate index cards. Give each child a card and ask them to find the child with their match.

---Try all the above, but in a file folder format. Glue one part of the Polar Animal Shape to the file folder and laminate it's match.

--Cut four or five different Polar Animal Shapes from different colors of paper. Give each child one Polar Animal Shape and have them form groups depending on what color they have... red animals here... or have them form groups depending on what animal they have.. penguins here.

Polar Animal Shape Hop

Cut out large polar animal shapes from colored paper. Laminate them and cut them out. Place them on the floor and ask the children to hop from one shape to another. These may also be used at seat markers for group time.

~Submitted by Tammy in NC



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